First-hand accounts tell the fix-it tale

       First-hand work summaries accompanied some of the Spirit Award applications. Excerpts from the Tyree and Kliewer efforts appear below:
       Tyree: We had an existing house built in 1926 that actually is a third-generation Westside home. My grandfather first lived in the home in the 1940's along with my father... Our plan was to take this existing 1,200 square foot home with a cellar as a laundry room, and add a 1,700 square foot addition including a two-car garage, all on one level. We acted as the general contractor and lived in the existing home 24/7 while the new addition was being built…
       Prior to beginning construction on the new addition, we replaced and upgraded all the existing water, sewer and gas lines. We also replaced all the old single pane glass windows with new double pane vinyl windows. The new addition is actually built around the existing home, tying the two together with a new roof and stucco system on the new and existing exterior walls. One would have to know that there was an existing house in the middle of all this construction to know that the entire house was not new construction.
      
       Kliewer: Our home was built in 1895 as a one-story Victorian cottage with “simplified Queen Anne style features,” according to city historian Deborah Abele…
       [After extensive repairs to the foundation], we eventually decided to take advantage of the potential living area which a new “attic roof” second story would provide… We did not want the new construction to look like an obvious addition. We hoped that the new portion of our home would be a visual extension of the original section. We also hoped that the new roofline would not tower over those of our neighbors, but blend in nicely with the heights of surrounding houses…
       We subcontracted the foundation work, the framing of the addition and the roofing. The rest of the work… we did ourselves.

Westside Pioneer article