Midland murals help in picturing IB concepts

       Two colorful murals have appeared this fall in the lobby of Midland Elementary Fred Eyer puts finishing touches on his IB attitudes/profiles mural in the Midland Elementary lobby. He drew the globe 
and hands and created the caricatures for each attitude, while the profiles were clipped and positioned at the top. In the background, over his left shoulder, is part of 
his mural that’s become the new Midland logo.
Westside Pioneer photo
       They are both from the hand of Fred Eyer, a local caricature specialist and husband of Midland French teacher Pascale Arnol.
       The first work, painted this summer on the lobby's west wall, is a logo for the school that points up its International Baccalaureate (IB) educational focus. It features three children (one's head dots the I in “IB”), the school's Mustang mascot and the words “Midland International.”
       The second mural, finished last week, depicts IB's global reach, augmented by caricature scenarios Eyer created of the 12 IB “attitudes” along with existing pictures for the 10 IB “profiles” he positioned in the mural.
       The artist, whose professional work includes graphics for books, advertising and the Colorado Springs Sky Sox, had previously volunteered caricatures for his wife's class during the four years she's been at the school.
       This year, the school asked him to create the murals. “Fortunately they're pleased with my work,” Eyer said.
       Principal Robyn Colbert enthusiastically agrees, saying his art provides “a new fresh look to what Midland Mustangs stand for and highlights our main focus of IB and diversity.” The logo “definitely represents our culture within the building and our community in the neighborhood,” while the second mural helps people understand “what the attitudes and profiles stand for and how important they are to our school.” Fred Eyer's globe mural.He drew the globe and hands and created the caricatures for each attitude, while the profiles 
were clipped and positioned at the top.
Westside Pioneer photo
       Colbert added that when teachers from her previous IB school visited, “they went wild” over the murals, “stating they wished they had them and what great connections they make to help with understanding of some difficult concepts.”
       Eyer did most of the painting in his home studio, but to finalize the attitudes/profiles mural he needed to spend a few days working in the school this month. This attracted student interest. “Kids are always fascinated by the artist at work,” he said. “It's great.”

Westside Pioneer article